Weekend Project -Circular Vest – Threads

This weekend I’m working on the project I recently ran across in Threads. I purchased  a couple of slip on dresses from Goodwill last week.  Instead of coupling it with a basic blazer I think this circular vest will go nicely with both of them and keep with the season since its getting warmer. I will post step by step later tomorrow and let you know just how easy and accurate these measurements are. In the meantime directions and instructions are below if you want to try this out for yourself.

Circular Vest

Circular Vest – Threads

One circle of fabric makes a vest that highlights both sides of a special fabric. Choose a fabric that looks good on both sides.
One circle of fabric makes a vest that highlights both sides of a special fabric. Choose a fabric that looks good on both sides.
One circle of fabric makes a vest that highlights both sides of a special fabric. Choose a fabric that looks good on both sides.Photo: Jack Deutsch

To create this vest in less than an hour, you use two measurements to draft a circle and then just cut fabric and the armholes and bind the edges.

For a super-comfy version, choose a thick fabric such as fleece. For a more sweater-like creation, choose a loose knit. Finish the raw edges with strips of ribbed knit; you can shape the knit easily around the curved edges, and it stretches to fit. For a quicker no-sew version, make the vest out of fleece and cut the edges with pinking shears. For a double-sided option, topstitch two layers of fleece together.

Whether you make it in a lightweight fabric or in a cozy knit, this vest is the perfect addition to any wardrobe regardless of the season.

Draft and sew the vest
Start with your measurements to draft the vest pattern, and bind the edges with a coordinating rib knit.

1. Draft the pattern. Measure your bust circumference. Draw a circle with this measurement as the circle’s diameter.
2. Measure for the armholes. Measure across your back from arm to arm to determine how far apart to make the armholes. Determine the armhole depth by measuring from the top of your shoulder to about 3 inches below your armpit.

3. Draw the armholes. Center the armholes vertically on your pattern and mark them your back width apart (as determined in step 2).



4. Cut the fabric.
 Cut the pattern from your fabric, slashing open the armholes.



5. Cut and press the binding.
 Cut out 3-inch-wide strips of ribbed knit with the ribs running perpendicular to the strip. Fold the ribbed binding in half with wrong sides together. Align the long edges, and press. Fold the
raw edges towards the fold, and press.

Fold the binding’s raw edges toward the fold, and press.

6. Bind the edges. Sandwich the wrap’s raw edges in the fold of the binding, and topstitch it in place. Turn under any raw ends.

Sandwich the wrap’s raw edges in the fold of the binding.
Topstitch the binding in place.

7. Make the armhole binding. Cut two strips of pre-pressed binding 21⁄2 inches longer than your armhole. Pin them right sides together with the short ends aligned. Draw a 11⁄4-inch-long line centered on each end. Sew 1⁄16 inch around the line through both layers to form one end of the armhole, and cut as shown above. Repeat for the other armhole.



8. Fold the armhole bindings.
 Turn the binding right-side out, as shown at right. Turn under the short end’s raw edges 1⁄2 inch, and press.



9. Finish the armholes.
 Pin the bindings to the armholes, sandwiching the raw edges inside the bidning. Edgestitch the binding in place.

Pin the binding to the armhole.

excerpted from Threads magazine
Issue #146, p. 69

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